Courses

The golf “buddies trip” is a tradition as old as the game itself—a group of friends plan a trip to a golf destination where they will play more golf in a long weekend than they thought humanly possible, and pair it with great food, activities and camaraderie. The golf professionals at the American Club Resort
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SEWAILO GOLF CLUBTucson For those who don’t love the grit of the typical Arizona course, I recommend this one, an amenity of the Casino del Sol resort. Like Shadow Creek in Las Vegas, it’s a desert floor reshaped into hills and valleys with lots of waterscapes; generous, plush turfgrass; and hillsides of flowers. Strategically designed
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Golf Digest is aware of fewer than two dozen individuals who have played every course on our ranking of America’s 100 Greatest. They ticked them off over lifetimes largely well spent, and the grillrooms of this country have heard their stories. All are or were Golf Digest course-rating panelists—the card-carrying, often quite tan, pencil-wielding, low-handicap
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Bandon Dunes and Central Wisconsin aren’t the only enormous sand boxes of golf in America. In the southwest corner of Utah, in the shadow of Zion National Park, lies a sandbelt of rich, red, pulverized silica atop which half a dozen four-star golf courses have blossomed in the past quarter-century. This is where a seam
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Arcadia Bluffs, Michigan: Oct. 10-Nov. 12Shoulder-season green fees at Bluffs (above), No. 13 on America’s 100 Greatest Public Courses, drop to $90. That compares with $195 in the summer. The new South Course can be played for $75, down from $125 in peak months. RELATED: More information on Arcadia Bluffs Cabot Links, Nova Scotia: Oct.
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Great golf courses are easy. Design, conditioning, simple beauty. The ingredients that comprise our best courses, whether by feel or by scientific criteria, are firmly established. The tricky part is everything else; the vast middle tier of quirky, scruffy-around-the-edges layouts that feature just enough redemptive qualities to draw people back. What “best of” lists they
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It’s tough to fathom that one of the best course architects in American history did not start designing courses until, as a 32-year-old, A.W. Tillinghast was asked to help build what is now the Shawnee Inn Golf Course in the Poconos. A Philadelphia socialite, like other world-class Golden Age designers from Philadelphia including George Thomas,
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If you thought finding the perfect best-ball partner was hard, wait until the time comes when you feel you need to dump that person. Replacing one golf partner with another—firing one guy in favor of someone else is what it amounts to—is one of the most dreaded and difficult tasks in golf. It’s unsavory because,
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Few canvases in American golf are more beautiful than the northern California coast, with the Monterey Peninsula alone home to some of the world’s most-renowned courses. But even if you don’t have the time (or the budget) for a jaunt down to Pebble on your business trip to San Francisco, there’s plenty of great golf
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If you believe that golf was invented in Scotland, then there’s a little bit of the United Kingdom in every American golf course. But which public courses really provide an Old Country golf experience? Here’s a list of worthy candidates. Remember, we’re talking U.K. golf, which excludes Ireland. Sorry, Whistling Straits, Erin Hills and the
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You likely know that TPC Sawgrass started the Tournament Players Club movement in the 1980s as the first PGA Tour-owned and operated club. But do you know the origin of the concept of stadium golf, and how the TPC golf courses network grew since Sawgrass’ debut 38 years ago? Much credit is due to Deane
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Golf is a wonderful sport and the vast majority of things associated with it are equally as grand. However, in a game played by so many amateurs, run by multiple governing bodies and stakeholders and where everyone seems to think they’re an expert, there are a few protocols, rules, traditions—you name it—that simply don’t make
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New York City’s five boroughs—Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island—are home to 8.5 million people and 13 municipal golf courses. Those courses see more than 600,000 rounds played per year, but while tee times are at a premium, the prices are good (especially if you’re with a resident), and where else can you
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There are the obvious keys to a great golf trip, and then there are the elements you might not consider, some of which aren’t even that costly. With a little bit of foresight and creativity, there’s an opportunity to turn your next getaway into an all-time classic. Hire a driver Depending on how spread out
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With the possible exception of California’s Monterey Peninsula, home to Pebble Beach, Cypress Point, Spyglass and others, there isn’t a denser concentration of great golf in the world than on the eastern end of New York’s Long Island. Shinnecock Hills, host of this summer’s U.S. Open, is fourth on Golf Digest’s ranking of America’s 100
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In the pantheon of the great American golf course architects, you have the names all golfers know: A.W. Tillinghast, C.B. Macdonald, Robert Trent Jones Sr., Pete Dye and Tom Fazio. And most golfers are familiar with Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, site of this year’s U.S. Open. You know it as one of golf’s great championship
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For a fifth time, one of golf’s most hallowed grounds—Shinnecock Hills Golf Club—will host our country’s national championship. It is the only club to host the U.S. Open in three centuries, having hosted the 1896, 1986, 1995, 2004 and now 2018 (it will also host in 2026). Scottish greenskeeper Willie F. Davis designed the original
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Back in the 1960s, an Ohio kid checked in on the construction of what would become the highest-ranked course in the state. The design was The Golf Club, and the kid was Jack Nicklaus—a curious observer to the work being done by Pete Dye. Nicklaus, who by 1966 was a Grand Slam winner, would sign
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The partnership of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw, the men behind new Byron Nelson home Trinity Forest, has been one golf’s most respected architectural teams for quite some time. And it all started back in the late 1980s, when the pair visited a site for a course that was never built. This came soon after
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